Speaking Up for Dignity

Cogwebs

“The ideas that we acquire from the world around us, or build when links form between previously unrelated cogwebs, forms thread in a rich tapestry woven by the enchanted loom, the human brain.”  This poetic metaphor is from the physiologist Charles Sherrigton. ‘The brain is waking and with it the mind is returning.  It is as if the Milky Way entered upon some cosmic dance.Swifly the head-mass becomes an enchanted loom where millions of flashing shuttles weave a dissolving pattern. a;ways a meaningful pattern though never an abiding one; a shifting harmony of subpatterns,’ (Sherrington, Man on His Nature, P. 178.)

“Beliefs are not epiphenomena, mere accompaniments to the synaptic song-and-dance; all too often beliefs call the tune. This is particularly true of ethereal ideas, with their ability to tap our emotional energies. Linking a strong idea to an ethereal idea provides, in effect, a false alarm. The manipulated brain reacts as if to an emergency, not stopping to think, simply chooosing the most obvious course of action.  Influence technicians raise alarms in order to pressurize their victims into acting a certain way.”

“Societies and individuals always need some motivating factor to stop-and-think. If the balance of motivations is in favor of not pausing to reflect, as in Nazi Germany, then an ethereal idea can drive forceful action even when the idea itself is flatly contradicted by personal experience.”

An example of this might be when an FLDS mother knows her son is a good boy, yet she is forced to abandon him on the side of the road and declare him dead to the family forever because the polygamist prophet Warren Jeffs has declared him a son-of-perdition for no apparent reason.

“When there are strong motivations for believing an ethereal idea, its cogweb can become so strong that it distorts the cognitive landscape, a warping effect analagous to that of a black hole in space-time. Since established cogwebs play a large role in filtering incoming stimuli, new information will tend to be interpreted in support of the ethereal idea; the stronger the cogweb, the more it affects how the world is perceived.”

P. 221

This entry was posted onSaturday, February 9th, 2013 at 2:22 am and is filed under Blog, Brains & Psychology. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site. You can skip to the end and leave a response. Pinging is currently not allowed.

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